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Girl, bored with sister’s soccer game, makes 65-million-year-old fossil find

An Oregon girl decided digging in the dirt was more her speed than watching her big sister’s JV soccer game. And that decision turned into a major discovery.

Naomi Vaughan found something that she called her “Moana rock” after it reminded her of the Heart of Te Fiti from the hit Disney film, last year, CNN reported.

The “Moana rock” turned out to be something that dated back at least 65 million years.

>> Read more trending news 

It was actually an ancient fossil called an ammonite. Ammonites are extinct marine invertebrates, CNN reported.

Paleontologists told Oregon Live that they’re not normally found in Bend, but have been discovered more than 80 miles away.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

One paleontologist believes it came from an area further away, a town of Suplee, 112 miles east of Bend, Oregon Live reported. He believes that either there was a family connection between the two towns or that the fossil came from a school collection. 

And while well-preserved ammonite fossils can fetch big bucks -- up to thousands of dollars, Vaughan’s sample may be worth about $10 or $20.

Vaughan plans on keeping her find, Oregon Live reported.

School district cuts one day off school week; students will only go for four days a week

A three-day weekend every week! That’s what students in a Denver-area school district will get starting next year.

It was a plan that has been discussed over the past few months, but this week became a reality. The 27J school district officials have adopted a Tuesday-through-Friday week, with students in class longer each day, WTMJ reported

Elementary students will go to school from 7:50 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Middle and high school students will be in class from 8:30 a.m. to 4:32 p.m. 

But why the change?

District officials say they hope to recruit and retain teachers. Educators leave the 27J district for better pay. The district hopes that the shorter work week will keep their teachers in their district.

It will also help save $1 million a year on transportation, utilities and substitute teachers, the Denver Post reported.

The 27J district isn’t the only one in the country to adopt a shorter learning week. There are about 100 other districts in the U.S. that have longer weekends, WTMJ reported.

The district will offer child care on Mondays, from 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. that will cost parents $30 per child a day, the Post reported.

For more, click here.

Man says he was kicked off flight over business logo on his shirt

He makes a living with his skateboard and his brand, but this month Justin Mallory said that’s exactly what got him in trouble. 

Mallory claims he was kicked off a flight out of Atlanta because of his business logo on his shirt which features guns. 

“I was flabbergasted. I was taken aback,” Mallory said. 

The professional skateboarder said he was kicked off a Frontier Airlines flight because of the logo.

“The shirt is just a graphic,” Mallory told Wilfon. 

>> Read more trending news 

He said the airline said the shirt made another passenger uncomfortable.

Mallory’s lawyer, Mawuli Davis, calls it discrimination.

“The shirt, some would say he’s dressed in a hip-hop fashion, and he’s African-American. Those three things may have all contributed to the discrimination and profiling against him,” Davis said. 

Frontier Airlines tells a much different story.

In a statement to WSB, the airline indicated Mallory’s shirt and race had nothing to do with it.

Frontier said Mallory “became argumentative prior to boarding when asked to check a skateboard. The passenger boarded the aircraft and continued to exhibit disruptive behavior.”

“That’s totally false,” Mallory told Wilfon. 

Because he was kicked off the flight, Mallory said he missed a skateboarding trade show where he planned to promote his brand.

Instead, he said it got him in trouble.

“It was a terrible situation. It was embarrassing. I don’t want to see it happen to anyone else. I wouldn’t wish it on someone,” Mallory said. 

Mallory and his lawyer told Wilfon they are considering a lawsuit.

Trump: 'Crazy Joe Biden' would 'go down fast and hard' in a fight

President Donald Trump took to Twitter early Thursday to slam Joe Biden over controversial comments that the former vice president made at a rally Tuesday.

>> Read more trending news 

Without a voice, DC reporter Jamie Dupree's work still resonates across the US

A familiar Cox Radio voice is determined to be heard again.

>> On Cox DC bureau reporter loses voice in medical mystery

Cox Media Group Washington correspondent Jamie Dupree has spent more than three decades covering Capitol Hill, but nearly two years ago, his method of communication had to change.

>> The radio silence of Jamie Dupree

Doctors say a rare neurological condition is making it difficult for his brain to tell his tongue what to do while speaking. Placing a pen in his mouth helps him speak.

“It’s hard, but I am working to come back hard,” Dupree tells WSB Radio.

>> Read Jamie Dupree's Washington Insider blog here

He is now hoping a meeting with specialists at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta will help him figure out why he lost his voice. 

And the reporter in him has not quit.

“He still does interviews; he feeds us audio,” WSB Radio News Director Chris Camp says. Dupree also covers Congress via Facebook, Twitter and Cox Media Group websites. 

>> DC reporter Jamie Dupree honored on House floor

“He may not be able to talk, but boy you can hear him awful loud,” Camp adds.

Dupree is thankful to all who have wished him well. While the condition has obviously affected his job, that is not what he says hurts him the most.

“Think about not being able to talk to your kids, or your wife or your father or your friends. While my work is hard and different, life is about a lot more than that.”

>> WATCH: WSB-TVs Berndt Petersen speaks with Jamie about his struggle over the past couple years

Dupree says Emory researchers are trying a new treatment that will slow down the movement of his tongue to make it easier for him to speak. In the meantime, Jamie wants everyone to know his overall health is good.

“Even though he can't speak, Jamie is still the most trusted voice in Washington DC,” WSB Radio’s Bill Caiaccio says of his colleague and friend. “He was already the hardest working reporter in our nation’s capital, and now he works even harder to get the job done.”

WSB Radio anchor Chris Chandler echoes those sentiments, saying, "I've always said Jamie is the most valuable on-air presence on our stations, and he still is.

“There's not a word of news from Washington that he hasn't reported and broken down for us.”

Mark Arum, WSB Radio traffic anchor and talk show host, adds that Dupree is an invaluable resource: “He might have lost his voice, but he still has the drive to get the story and get it right.”

>> Read more trending news 

Sabrina Cupit, who anchors midday for WSB Radio, says Dupree is so much more than his voice: “His knowledge of Washington, his connections, his balanced reporting; they are all still a major part of what we do on air every day here at WSB.

“Personally, I have never met a kinder, more honest or just downright great human being in my life. I am praying for the return of his voice. I do miss hearing it.”

Get Dupree's take on what's happening in Washington delivered to your inbox every weekday by clicking here.

Jamie Dupree is a reporter for the Cox Media Group Washington News Bureau. 

Travis AFB: Driver dead after gaining 'unauthorized access' to base's main gate, crashing

Officials at Travis Air Force Base in California say a car gained “unauthorized access” to the base’s main gate and later crashed.

>> Read more trending news 

2 charged after woman found being eaten alive by maggots, police say

A Georgia woman was found covered in cockroaches and maggots, bedridden on a sheet smeared in feces, a police report says. 

Her caretakers and family members, 54-year-old Terry Ward Sorrells and 18-year-old Christian Alexander Sorrells, have both been charged with neglect of a disabled adult or elder person

>> On Cops: Home invaders tie up woman and son, steal jewelry

Gwinnett County Fire and Emergency Services responded to the Sugar Hill home where the woman lived with Terry Sorrells and Christian Sorrells on March 15 after receiving a call for medical assistance. The woman was unresponsive but still alive, the report says.

The AJC is not identifying the woman because she is an alleged victim of neglect.

>> MORE NEWS: 55 hours of terror, and a final blast in Austin serial bombings

When the fire crew arrived, they said they saw that maggots and roaches were eating the woman’s flesh and her legs were “completely black and showing signs of decomposition.” They had transported her a month earlier with a “mega mover” — a tarp-like object used by emergency medical technicians to move obese patients — and she was sitting on the same mega mover, now “completely brown and black” and covered in feces. The fire crew called police because “they did not believe she would live much longer and felt a moral obligation to report this,” the report says.

The living conditions inside the home on Pine Tree Circle were “deplorable,” the responding officer said in his report. The officer was “overwhelmed with the smell of human feces and garbage” when he walked into the house, and roaches were crawling on the walls and ceiling of “every single room,” the report says. Garbage lined the floor from the entryway to the kitchen, and covered the floor of the bathroom. In Terry Sorrells’ bedroom, there was a two-foot-high pile of empty Monster energy drink cans, with garbage piled in a closet and covering a dresser, the report says. 

>> Read more trending news 

Terry Sorrells had gone with the woman in an ambulance before the officer arrived, but Christian Sorrells remained at the house. He told the officer that the woman had been bedridden for one or two years and had been progressively getting worse; she had been admitted into a long-term care facility, but returned home after Medicaid would not cover the cost, the report says. Christian Sorrells also told the officer that no one in the house worked. 

Christian Sorrells was transported to Gwinnett County police headquarters and Terry Sorrells was arrested later that day. Both were booked into the Gwinnett County Detention Center after 10 p.m. March 15. They remain in jail, each held on a $22,200 bond. 

Austin bombings: How to help the victims

As the investigation into the acts of serial bombing suspect Mark Conditt continues, many are taking the opportunity to reflect on the lives of those lost in the attacks across Austin and central Texas in March.

>> READ MORE: Austin bombings: 25-minute recording left behind by suspected bomberWho is Mark Anthony Conditt, the suspected Austin bomber?Trump says 'it's not easy to find' culprit in first public comment on Austin bombings'Hold your leaders accountable': Chance the Rapper tweets about Austin bombingsPhotos: Austin police investigate explosions | For investigators, a race to decode hidden message in Austin bombingsMap shows location of 4 Austin bombsAustin explosions: 2 men hurt in fourth blast this monthOfficials increase reward to $115,000 for information on Austin bombingsMan held in SXSW threat ruled out as bomb suspect, police sayAustin package explosions: 3 blasts appear connected, claim 2 lives, police sayThe Roots' SXSW show canceled after bomb threat; man arrestedAustin package bombings: Friends remember victims Draylen Mason, Anthony House | MORE

Anthony Stephan House, the 39-year-old man who was killed in the first bombing on March 2, left behind a wife and daughter. His family started a GoFundMe page to help his surviving family members with bills related to House’s death and repairs to their home after the explosion. Any extra money will go to a fund for House’s daughter’s future education. The fundraiser has raised more than $36,000 as of Wednesday. There’s also a second fund, started by House’s mother, which aims to raise money specifically for House’s 8-year-old daughter “to help secure her future.” That fundraiser has raised more than $5,200 as of Wednesday.

>> On Complete coverage of the Austin bombings

Draylen Mason, 17, an Austin musician and aspiring neurosurgeon, was killed by a second bombing attack on March 12. His family has set up a YouCaring page to help with memorial costs, as well as to help with repairs to the family home before Mason’s mother and grandmother can return to the house. The family has raised more than $106,000 as of Wednesday.

>> On Mason family on bombing suspect: ‘We can now start to move forward’

Four others were wounded in the attacks. Mason’s mother, Shamika Wilson, was injured in the explosion that killed her son, and Esperanza Herrera, 75, was injured in a separate package explosion later that same day. Two unidentified men were injured when a bomb, which police said was likely triggered by a trip wire, exploded on Dawn Song Drive in Southwest Austin on March 18.

>> Read more trending news 

Smoke alarm recall: 500,000 Kidde detectors might not alert users to fire

Kidde recalled about 500,000 dual-sensor smoke alarms Wednesday because they pose a risk of people not being alerted to a fire in their home.

>> Nearly 600,000 pacifiers, teether holders recalled amid concerns about choking

A yellow cap left on during the manufacturing process can cover one of the two smoke sensors and compromise the smoke alarm’s ability to detect smoke.

About 452,000 devices were sold in the United States, in addition to 40,000 sold in Canada.

>> Johnsonville recalls 109K pounds of sausage after reports of plastic contamination

This recall involves models PI2010 and PI9010 of Kidde dual-sensor (photoelectric and ionization) smoke alarms. “KIDDE” is printed on the front center of the smoke alarm. The model number and date code are printed on the back of the alarm.

The recall includes:

Model: PI9010 (DC/battery powered)Date Code: September 10, 2016 through October 13, 2017

Model: PI2010 (AC/hardwired)Date Code: September 10, 2016 through October 13, 2017

>> 1.4 million Ford vehicles recalled after reports that steering wheel can come loose

People should remove the alarm from their wall or ceiling and look through the opening on the side of the alarm for a yellow cap. People should not attempt to take apart the alarm, open the casing, or otherwise remove the yellow cap themselves. If a yellow cap is present, people should immediately contact Kidde to receive instructions and request a free replacement smoke alarm. They should remove and discard the recalled smoke alarm only after they receive and install the replacement alarm. If no yellow cap is present, people should reinstall the smoke alarm and no further action is needed.

>> Read more trending news 

The United States Consumer Product Safety Commission has received one report of the yellow protective cap being present on a smoke alarm before it was installed in a home. No reports of incidents or injuries as a result of a yellow cap being present have been reported.

>> On Boston's bravest: Facing a hidden killer

The affected smoke alarms were sold at Home Depot, Walmart and other department, home and hardware stores nationwide and online at, and other websites from September 2016 through January 2018 for between $20 and $40.

Read more here.

Fake Facebook page sends city into tizzy over snakes

When most of northwest Georgia was preparing for severe storms, one city had to contend with the idea that snakes are lurking in sewers — or so they thought

>> Read more trending news

Calhoun Mayor Jimmy Palmer said ­the “City of Calhoun, Gordon County GA” Facebook page — where a post about snakes originated — is fake. 

“My wife saw it and actually called me,” Palmer said

The post, which has been up since 2:27 p.m. Monday, alleges a Calhoun police officer killed the “copperhead as it came out of the sewer in front of the courthouse” and urges residents to avoid the sewers, which may have more snakes. The post has garnered 19,000 reactions and more than 123,000 shares on Facebook — and it still has some panicked. 

“I’ve had comments like ‘Is it safe to walk down the street’ and those things,” Palmer said. “I don’t think the people who put it on there realize the impact.” 

The page, which has more than 12,000 followers, has been so believable that other law enforcement agencies have tagged the page or shared its posts, WSB-TV reported. Police say it’s been difficult finding the owner since the page is usually taken down before the person is caught. The page was still open just after 8 p.m. Tuesday. 

The city attorney plans to send a notice to Facebook notifying it of the fake page. The notice reads in part: “The objection is that this Facebook page impersonates and misrepresents to be the City’s official page by displaying a version of the official municipal seal and describes itself clearly as a ‘government organization.’

Fake city pages are hardly new. 

In October 2016, comedian Ben Palmer created a fake city of Atlanta Facebook page, poking fun at the city’s crime and public safety efforts. The city, however, responded to the Facebook page’s use of the trademarked Atlanta City Seal, which was used without proper authorization. Creative changes were made to the satirical page’s seal to avoid trademark conflicts. 

But while the fake city of Atlanta page is still going strong (it has more than 154,000 followers), some are hoping the fake Calhoun page is removed from Facebook. 

Calhoun resident Matt Wiley said he is happy the city is adamant about the page’s removal: “For the sake of the city, that’s not a bad move just to make sure the people are informed. If you start spreading misinformation, panic might ensue, especially if it’s an alligator or a giant snake.”

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