Now Playing
X106.5

entertainment

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >

Chelsea Clinton working on book about endangered animals

Chelsea Clinton's career as a children's author continues with a picture book about endangered animals.

Penguin Young Readers announced Monday that the daughter of Bill and Hillary Clinton is collaborating with illustrator Gianna Marino on "Don't Let Them Disappear." Scheduled for April 2, the book will celebrate whales, tigers and other animals and provide advice on how to help preserve them.

Clinton said in a statement that she wanted to help young people learn that some animals are in "desperate need of our attention." Her previous works include "She Persisted: 13 American Women Who Changed the World" and "Start Now! You Can Make a Difference."

Actor Geoffrey Rush accused of sexual misconduct

"Orange Is the New Black" actress Yael Stone alleged actor Geoffrey Rush engaged in sexually inappropriate behavior when they starred in "The Diary of a Madman" in 2010.

Speaking to The New York Times , the 33-year-old said Rush danced naked in front of her in their dressing room, used a mirror to watch her while she showered and sent her occasionally erotic texts.

Stone said she "enthusiastically and willingly" replied to the texts from her fellow Australian actor when she was 25 and he was 59.

"I was so flattered that someone like that would spend their time texting me into the very early hours of the morning," she said. "Gradually the text messages became more sexual in nature, but always encased in this very highfalutin intellectual language."

"I'm embarrassed by the ways I participated," Stone said. "I certainly wouldn't engage as the person I am now in the way I did when I was 25."

Stone said she was trying to manage "uncomfortable moments" without offending the star.

In a statement , Rush said the allegations "are incorrect and in some instances have been taken completely out of context."

"However, clearly Yael has been upset on occasion by the spirited enthusiasm I generally bring to my work. I sincerely and deeply regret if I have caused her any distress. This, most certainly, has never been my intention," Rush said.

A representative for Stone referred The Associated Press to her original comments. A Rush representative did not return an email seeking additional comments Monday morning.

The allegations came as Rush awaited a verdict in a defamation lawsuit that he filed in Australia.

Rush sued the Daily Telegraph's publisher, Nationwide News, and a journalist over two articles and a newspaper poster published in 2017. They related to a report he behaved inappropriately toward a co-star during a Sydney Theatre Company production of King Lear in 2015 and 2016.

The Academy Award-winning actor denied the allegation.

A judge is expected to issue a ruling next year.

Country band Alabama mark 50 years with new tour

Country band Alabama will mark their 50th year together with a new tour in 2019, more than a year after founding member Jeff Cook announced that he has Parkinson's disease.

The Grammy-winning trio of Randy Owen, Teddy Gentry and Cook formed in 1969 in Fort Payne, Alabama, and went on to dominate the sound of country music in the 1980s, scoring dozens of No. 1 hits, including classics like "Mountain Music" and "Dixieland Delight."

Guitarist and fiddle player Cook announced in 2017 that he had been diagnosed with the chronic neurological disorder years ago and he would limit his touring with the band. Cook will perform on their new tour, which begins Jan. 10 in Detroit, as much as he's physically able.

___

Online:

http://thealabamaband.com

Meghan's father Thomas Markle appeals to her to call home

Thomas Markle appealed to his daughter Meghan to call home, saying Monday they hadn't spoken since her wedding to Prince Harry in May.

The former actress, now known as the Duchess of Sussex, has ignored his attempts to get in touch, Thomas Markle told ITV. Markle had been scheduled to walk his daughter down the aisle, but pulled out of the wedding at the last moment because of heart problems.

"I love my daughter very much and she has to know that, and I would really appreciate if she would call me, just reach out to me," Markle said in the interview from San Diego.

In Markle's first television interview since the duchess announced her pregnancy in October, the 74-year-old grandfather-to-be agreed he'd been "ghosted" by his daughter. He suggested the royal couple had been influenced by media reports about him.

"The funny thing about my daughter and Prince Harry is that they believe everything they read in the paper," he said. "What's happened, I'm not sure. I'd love to talk about it. I think it comes back to the fact that reporters pick up on interviews I've done and write their own stories and tell lies."

Markle hopes Queen Elizabeth II will help heal the rift.

He also rejected the notion his daughter had a habit of dumping those she no longer needed.

"That's really not a character trait," he said. "She's always been very polite to everyone, never been rude to anyone. I don't know what's really happening right now."

Jeff Bridges to receive Cecil B. DeMille Award at Globes

Jeff Bridges may have once been considered as one of Hollywood's most underappreciated actors, but next month's Golden Globe Awards will showcase his life and illustrious career next month by bestowing him one of its highest honors.

Bridges will receive the Cecil B. DeMille Award during the 76th annual awards ceremony on Jan. 6, 2019, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association announced Monday. The actor been praised for starring in films including "Crazy Heart," ''True Grit," ''Hell or High Water" and "The Big Lebowski," which became a cult classic thanks to his nonchalant, knit-sweater wearing character Jeffrey "The Dude" Lebowski.

HFPA President Meher Tatna said in a statement the Golden Globe winner has "captured hearts and minds" of audiences worldwide.

Bridges, 69, won a Globe in 2010 for best actor for his role in "Crazy Heart," when he remarked at the time during his acceptance speech about "chipping away" at his underappreciated status. He went on to win an Academy Award that year, and also received previous Globe nominations for his performances in "Starman," ''The Fisher King," ''Contender" and "Hell or High Water."

The DeMille Award is given annually to an "individual who has made an incredible impact on the world of entertainment." Past recipients include Oprah Winfrey, Morgan Freeman, Meryl Streep, Jodie Foster, Barbra Streisand, Sidney Poitier and Lucille Ball.

The Globes next year is also adding the Carol Burnett Award, an accolade that focuses on life achievement in television. The inaugural award will go to the 85-year-old Burnett, a five-time winner at the Globes.

In 1983, Bridges founded the End Hunger Network, a nonprofit dedicated to feeding children globally.

Bridges co-executive produced the 1996 television film "Hidden in America," which focused on poverty in America.

This year, he appeared in the mystery thriller "Bad Times at the El Royale" starring Chris Hemsworth, Jon Hamm and Dakota Johnson.

Miss Universe 2018: Who is Miss Philippines Catriona Gray, this year's winner?

Miss Philippines Catriona Gray was crowned the winner of this year's Miss Universe competition Monday in Bangkok, Thailand.

>> PHOTOS: Miss Philippines Catriona Gray wins Miss Universe 2018

Here are five things you should know about Gray, a 24-year-old model, singer and TV host from the Philippines' Albay province:

1. She grew up in Australia. Gray, whose father is Scottish and mother is Filipina, was born in Cairns, Queensland, where she attended Trinity Anglican School, according to the Manila Standard and the Central Telegraph. At age 18, she moved to the Philippines, ABC-CBN reported.

>> Miss Universe 2018: Philippines’ Catriona Gray wins crown in Thailand

2. The singer studied music in Boston. Gray attended the Berklee College of Music and has a master’s certificate in music theory, according to the Miss World Philippines website. She's also "known to spontaneously burst into song," the Miss Universe website says.

3. She's working to raise awareness about HIV/AIDS and end poverty. According to the Miss Universe website, Gray is an advocate for LoveYourself, an organization that promotes HIV/AIDS prevention, testing and education. She's also a volunteer teacher's assistant for Young Focus, which works with young people in poverty. 

4. She's a daredevil. Gray, who loves to travel, "is always game for heart-racing adventures," such as zip lining, the Miss Universe website says. She also enjoys the outdoors and has a black belt in Choi Kwang-Do, according to the Miss World Philippines website.

>> Read more trending news 

5. She loves food and cooking. Gray is "openly passionate about her love for Filipino dishes, including adobobalut [boiled bird embryo] and the sweetest mangoes in the world," the Miss Universe website says

Read more here or here.

Photos: Miss Philippines Catriona Gray wins Miss Universe 2018

The Philippines’ Catriona Gray was named Miss Universe 2018 in a competition concluding Monday in Bangkok, besting contestants from 93 other countries and delighting her home nation.

Miss Universe 2018: Philippines’ Catriona Gray wins crown in Thailand

The Philippines’ Catriona Gray beat out contestants from 93 countries to win the 67th annual Miss Universe pageant Sunday night in Bangkok, Thailand. 

>> Read more trending news 

Gray bested first runner-up South Africa’s Tamaryn Green and Sthefany Gutierrez of Venezuela, who rounded out the top three.

>> PHOTOS: Miss Philippines Catriona Gray wins Miss Universe 2018

She succeeds Demi-Leigh Nel-Peters of South Africa who took home the crown last year.

>> Who is Catriona Gray, Miss Universe 2018?

Comedian and talk show host Steve Harvey returned to host the contest and did not misread the winner’s name as he did in 2015, although Miss Costa Rica, a TV host, too, joked about the infamous mix-up, according to PhilStar Global.

Harvey asked her if she had any professional advice for him 

and she joked, “If they ever give you, like, a really, really, really important envelope, try to read it carefully, OK?”

The pageant was judged this year by seven women, including business women and former Miss Universe winners, in keeping with the contest’s theme of “Empowered Women.”

>> Related: Miss America to end swimsuit competition

The pageant also made history this year with the first transgender contestant to ever take part in the contest. Miss Spain, Angela Ponce, however, did not make the top 20.

Miss USA, Sarah Rose Summers, did make the finals, but did not break the top 10.

 

Top of mind: 'Justice' is Merriam-Webster's word of the year

Racial justice. Obstruction of justice. Social justice. The Justice Department. Merriam-Webster has chosen "justice" as its 2018 word of the year, driven by the churning news cycle over months and months.

The word follows "toxic," picked by Oxford Dictionaries, and "misinformation," plucked by Dictonary.com.

Peter Sokolowski, Merriam-Webster's editor at large, told The Associated Press ahead of Monday's announcement that "justice" consistently bubbled into the top 20 or 30 lookups on the company's website, spiking at times due to specific events but also skating close to the surface for much of the year.

While it's one of those common words people likely know how to spell and use correctly in a sentence, Sokolowski pointed to other reasons that drive search traffic. Among them is an attempt to focus a train of thought around a philosophical problem, or to seek aspirational motivation. Such well-known words are often among the most looked up every year, including those that are slightly abstract, including "love," he said.

The designation for "justice" came soon after President Trump's one-time fixer, Michael Cohen, was sentenced to three years in prison for crimes that included arranging the payment of hush money to conceal his boss' alleged sexual affairs. He told a judge he agreed time and again to cover up Trump's "dirty deeds" out of "blind loyalty."

It also came ahead of a Senate vote on the "First Step Act," a criminal justice reform bill with broad bipartisan support. Earlier in the year, Kim Kardashian West not once but twice paid a White House visit on Trump to discuss prison and sentencing reform. Sentencing for drug crimes, treatment for opioid addiction, a loosening of cannabis laws, a Tesla probe, the Mueller investigation into the Trump campaign: Justice will remain top of mind into the new year.

"These are stories that connect to the culture and to society across races, across classes," Sokolowski said. "We get this word that filters in."

That includes Twitter in a big way.

Often, when Trump tweets about the Department of Justice, he uses simply "Justice." On Aug. 1, when he tweeted his wish for then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions to stop the Mueller investigation, searches spiked significantly. Trump referred to "obstruction of justice," a separate entry on the Merriam-Webster site, prompting a lookup increase of 900 percent over the same date the year before.

Searches for "justice" throughout the year, when compared to 2017, were up 74 percent on the site that has more than 100 million page views a month and nearly half a million entries, Sokolowski said. To be word of the year worthy, an entry has to show both a high volume of traffic and a significant year-over-year increase in lookups — as opposed to, say, a word that merely buzzed or felt lofty, he said.

"We are not editorializing. We looked at our data and we were ourselves surprised by this word," Sokolowski said. "This is a word that people have been thinking about for this entire year."

The word "justice" comes from Latin, unlike a lot of the more emotional words that rose in Old English. Old English did have "law," ''fair" and "right," but never "justice," in reference to a system of laws.

"It's not a coincidence that it comes from the 12th century, which immediately follows the Norman conquest. When the Normans invaded England they brought their language, Old French, which was basically the then-modern version of Latin. They brought their system of government and laws and imposed them on the people they conquered, and that's why all of the legal language in English today is Latin, just like the word justice," Sokolowski explained. "It took the imposition of a system of laws to bring us the word justice."

One rule breaker: "witness," a word with a purely Old English start.

Other words that experienced lookup spikes this year: "maverick" (Sen. John McCain died); "respect" (Aretha Franklin died); "excelsior" (Stan Lee's signature battle cry. He died); "pissant" (A radio host described Tom Brady's daughter that way); "pansexual" (Janelle Monae described herself that way); "laurel" (Remember laurel vs. yanny?); "feckless" (What Samantha Bee called Ivanka Trump, combined with a pejorative that begins with "c''); "epiphany" (The title of a BTS K-pop song that dropped this year); "lodestar" (used in reference to McCain in the anonymous New York Times op-ed identified as coming from inside the Trump administration); and "nationalism" (At an Oct. 22 rally in Texas, Trump declared himself a nationalist).

Philippines' Catriona Gray named Miss Universe 2018

The Philippines' Catriona Gray was named Miss Universe 2018 in a competition held in Bangkok on Monday, besting contestants from 93 other countries and delighting her home nation.

Gray wore a sparkling red dress that she said was inspired by a volcano in the Philippines as she was handed the crown to the delight of a roaring crowd in the Thai capital that generally favored Southeast Asian contestants.

The 24-year-old singer and model said she wore red because "when I was 13, my mom said she had a dream that I would win Miss Universe in a red dress." She said her mom cried when they saw each other after she won the competition, the 67th Miss Universe pageant.

Gray edged out first runner-up Tamaryn Green of South Africa and third-place Sthefany Gutierrez of Venezuela. She succeeds Demi-Leigh Nel-Peters of South Africa.

In the Philippines, pageants are a popular attraction, and Gray's countrymen watching the televised contest cheered wildly and jumped for joy when she was declared the winner.

Celebrations were especially buoyant in Oas town in the northeastern province of Albay, from which Gray's Filipina mother hails. According to Gray, her gown's design, with its lava color and appearance, was influenced by Albay's iconic Mayon Volcano.

Gray's father is Australian, and she was born and grew up in Cairns, Australia. She studied at the Berklee College of Music in Boston in the United States.

The office of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte was quick to congratulate the winner — the fourth Filipina to be named Miss Universe.

"Ms. Gray truly made the entire Philippines proud when she sashayed on the global stage and showcased the genuine qualities defining a Filipina beauty: confidence, grace, intelligence and strength in the face of tough challenges," Duterte said in a statement from the presidential palace. "In her success, Miss Philippines has shown to the world that women in our country have the ability to turn dreams into reality through passion, diligence, determination and hard work."

An early round of questioning touched on the issue of drugs, a controversial subject in the Philippines, where Duterte's aggressive anti-drug crackdown has taken thousands of lives, many in what critics charge were extrajudicial executions. Duterte raised even more controversy when he recently joked that he smoked marijuana to deal with his busy schedule of meetings with other Asian leaders at a regional summit.

Asked what she thought about legalizing marijuana, Gray said: "I'm for it being used for medical use, but not so for recreational use. Because I think if people will argue, then what about alcohol and cigarettes? Everything is good, but in moderation."

This year's Miss Universe competition included the first-ever transgender contestant, Angela Ponce of Spain. She said in a video presentation that it was not important for her to win, but was more important for her "to be here."

One of the few controversies of this year's contest involved Miss United States, Sarah Rose Summers, who appeared to mock contestants from Cambodia and Vietnam over their English language skills. Summers apologized.

The finale was again hosted by Steve Harvey, who infamously announced the wrong winner in the 2015 contest. Harvey joked briefly about the incident in exchanges with contestants, saying, "You all can't let that go" and "I'm still here."

The theme of this year's pageant was "Empowered Women" and was judged by seven women, including former pageant winners, businesswomen and a fashion designer.

___

Associated Press writer Jim Gomez in Manila, Philippines, contributed to this report.

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >
 

Amazon Alexa

Enable our Skill today to listen live at home on your Alexa Devices!